Is Mattress Cleaning Really Necessary?

Is Mattress Cleaning Really Necessary?

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On average, we spend one-third of our time in bed.  There is nothing more relaxing than laying around in our p j’s just chillin’ on a lazy Saturday morning. We all need time to recharge.  But did you know that our mattresses are a place that millions of dust mites call home?!!!  Do you think you might want to clean your mattresses yet?  Here are a few facts that might help you to decide.

These little mites are quite hospitable and just love to curl up with you.  They prefer to live in warm, moist environments, making your pillow and mattresses cozy spots.  Our bodies create high amounts of moisture by way of perspiration and breathing while we sleep.   As humidity levels increase, we provide the ideal conditions for the dust mites to thrive.  That’s right – go ahead and burrow down into those warm soft sheets. mattress cleaning tips Then flip that pillow to the cool side and hug  it tight while you bury your face into its soft folds. You will never see these microscopic bugs belonging to the arachnid family, nor will you feel them crawling on your skin – they don’t even bite. Nonetheless their “poop” is the leading cause of indoor allergy symptoms…sneezing, headache, itchy eyes, skin irritation, runny nose, hay fever, etc.  Ready for a professional mattress cleaning?

They live on flaked off dead skin cells from people and their pets.  Since we spend around eight hours a day on average in bed, a large amount of these skin cells end up in our mattresses.  They filter down through our sheets as we toss and turn during the night.  This skin and scale debris is what we  commonly call dander.  Dander is concentrated in everyone’s mattresses, upholstery, carpet and rugs that we come into contact every day.  Humans generally slough off one-third oz. dead skin per week so these critters have plenty to eat.  While they do serve to remove our dead skin cells from our living and sleeping environments, the fecal pellets are the results of their full little bellies.  Let’s do the math – estimated 2 million dust mites in the average bed mattress, producing 20 poop pellets each per night………hmmmm 40,000,000 daily.  If you want to call us now to schedule your mattress cleaning, go right ahead and call.

Just imagine how much of this fecal matter and dust mites (dead or alive) has accumulated inside your mattresses and pillows if you have neglected them for a few years.  Ten percent of a pillow’s weight that has been used nightly for two years, can be composed of dead mite remains.  Nearly 100,000 mites can live in one square yard of carpeting  About 80% of the material seen floating in a sunbeam is actually skin flakes.  Household upholstery supports high mite populations.  Are you sick to your stomach yet?

To control the little suckers, it is important to wash your bedding in HOT water weekly – they can survive cold water.  Vacuum your mattresses once a month.  Purchase a mite resistant cover.  You can also vacuum a pillow by placing it in a clean garbage bag, insert the hose and turn on the vacuum.  However, I think we all deserve a new pillow every now and again.  Either way, be sure to replace your pillows at least every 2 years.  Have them professionally cleaned and sanitized at least once a year – nothing will assure you a more peaceful night’s sleep.  So, be sure to add mattress cleaning to your professional carpet and upholstery cleaning routine when you call to schedule your appointment!!

Here is a very useful guide to the purchase of a mattress.

 

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We are sad to inform you, that in October of 2015 David Passed away. He will be sadly missed. His legacy continues in another fine business that he started from scratch and turned over to a highly qualified entrepreneur. R.I.P. David Fields October 2015